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New Mexico Chiles: History Legend, and Lore

In Book Reviews, Chile Peppers, History, Reviews, Stories by Mark MaskerLeave a Comment

With most firsthand account books, someone dies or at the very least you get a graphic description of some horrible event, complete with gory photos. This is typically followed by a round of talk show appearances, and up until a few years ago, crying on TV in front of Oprah. You wont’ find any of that crap in this upbeat chile love letter. Unlike many eyewitness-esque works, Kelly Urig’s New Mexico Chiles: History, Legend, and Lore is a positive tribute to an icon from the writer’s childhood. Here’s what I mean…

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Meet Charles Tanqueray: History in a Bottle

In History, Stories by Greg MaysLeave a Comment

Gin mastermind Charles Tanqueray can be a mysterious player in the world of liquor. Nearly 200 years after he crafted one of the world’s most lasting booze brands, there are few details about Charles that follow his green barrel-shaped bottles around the world. In a phone interview, Tanqueray’s current Master Distiller Tom Nichol gave me some insight into the legendary man.

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Meet Jack Daniel: History in a Bottle

In History, Stories by Greg MaysLeave a Comment

It occurred to me recently that outside of the iconic square bottle with the black label marked “Old No. 7,” most guys don’t know a lot about Jack Daniel. Like many other distillers, particularly those in the age before multi-billion dollar liquor conglomerates, Jack is a fascinating guy to learn about.

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Easier to Drink it Than to Say It?

In History, Stories by Dave DeWittLeave a Comment

I imagine that on your trips to the liquor store, you occasionally discover a liquor that you are not quite sure how to pronounce. These tend to be the imported liquors with French or Italian names, though sometimes you’re just looking at a made-up moniker. For example, Häagen-Dazs ice cream, a company founded in Brooklyn, chose a made-up name and included a map of Denmark on their early cartons.

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Happy National Hot Sauce Day!

In History, Stories by Mark MaskerLeave a Comment

I don’t know how you’re celebrating National Hot Sauce Day, but I’m working on a blueberry nasharab sauce for some chicken. I’ll post the results and review tomorrow. Meanwhile, I thought I’d share some history factoids from the early days of hot and spicy sauce for your amusement.

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Chiles Reach Africa: An Excerpt from Dave DeWitt’s New Food History Book, Precious Cargo: How Foods from the Americas Changed the World

In History, Stories by Dave DeWittLeave a Comment

The most likely scenario for the introduction and spread of chile peppers into Africa south of the Sahara is as follows. Varieties of Capsicum annuum and chinense were introduced into all West and East African Portuguese ports during the 40 years between 1493 and 1533, with the introduction into West Africa logically preceding that of East Africa. The chiles were first grown in small garden plots in coastal towns by the Portuguese settlers and later by the Africans.