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Do Chile Peppers Burn Fat?

In Science, Stories by Mark MaskerLeave a Comment

Researchers at the University of Wyoming uncovered evidence suggesting that chile peppers may do exactly that. Their studies indicate that capsaicin, the hot part in hot peppers, may amp up metabolism as well as turning white fat to brown fat.

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Are Chile Peppers Linked to Testosterone?

In Science, Stories by Mark MaskerLeave a Comment

Culinary peacocking makes up at least half of any chile pepper event. Not just in the traditional clothing sense, though. We men love to show our food machismo by eating food hot enough to melt your ex’s heart. Now, a study from the University of Grenoble may have confirmed what most of us already knew: the guys who eat the hottest peppers have the highest testosterone levels.

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Can Chiles Prevent Colon Cancer?

In Chile Peppers, News, Science, Stories by Mark MaskerLeave a Comment

If your ego ever shoved a chile in your maw that was hotter than your mouth could handle, you learned something very fast: capsaicin loves to piss off pain receptors. Some of us have even learned this lesson twice; once on eating the chile, again when it says good bye on the way out. What you may not know is that capsaicin keeps up the shenanigans all the way through your digestive system, all the way from point A to B. That pain is the basis of research suggesting that chile peppers may prevent colon cancer.

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Capsaicin: Living Hot is Living Healthy

In Science, Stories by Mark MaskerLeave a Comment

Yet again it looks like the spice is right as recent research suggests an incredibly wide scope in health benefits associated with the consumption of hot chile peppers. Not only do many varieties of fresh chiles contain considerable amounts of fiber, antioxidants, and vitamin A, B1, B2, B3, C, and E, it’s also been found that capsaicin (the active chemical component responsible for the fire in chilies) contributes positively to human health on its own.

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Cube Chile: Resistance is Futile

In Science, Stories by Harald ZoschkeLeave a Comment

… or is there a Chili’s Cube? According to a press release on April 1st, scientists have succeeded in the Dutch Westland in growing a jalapeno version in cube form. It was carried on a gene called A23-157. A tomato breeding, in the form of a cube, succeeded several years ago.